7.1. Importance & challenges

Hydrogen has a role to play in decarbonizing transport, since shipping contributed approximately 2.6% (938 million tons) to the world’s total CO2 emissions in 2012. H2 appears as a promising option for shipping because of its high ratio between transported weight and average mileage per day/trip, which are approximately 6000 tons and 750 km per trip.

Hydrogen is odorless, colorless, and tasteless, but using specific sensors means the detection of leakages is not a problem. To achieve a successful implementation of hydrogen technologies, more effort is required in:

  • infrastructure development
  • reduction of cost
  • increase of lifetime
  • a history of safety operations
  • new regulations, codes and standards by the International Maritime Organization and Classification Societies

CMB’s 1900 TEU ice class feeder which will be equipped with a hydrogen auxiliary engine

7.2. Demonstration project

In 2008, the FCS Alsterwasser was the first commercial inland passenger ship to use hydrogen fuel cell propulsion. It combines two fuel cell systems (48 kW) with a 560 V lead gel battery pack, and 50 kg of hydrogen stored at 350 bar.

In 2015, a marine fuel cell generator began being tested by Sandia National Laboratories. This generator integrates hydrogen storage, Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell power generation and power inverter equipment that is able to power up to 10 reefers with a total rated output of 100 kW at 240-volt AC.

Complete system of the FCS Alsterwasser, part of the Zemships project

7.3. demoproject 2

In 2015, a marine fuel cell generator began being tested by Sandia National Laboratories. This generator integrates hydrogen storage, Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell power generation and power inverter equipment that is able to power up to 10 reefers with a total rated output of 100 kW at 240-volt AC.

Maritime fuel cell generator (Joseph W. Pratt and Shuk Han Chan)

7.4. Behydro

In the course of 2018, ABC Engines and CMB have created BeHydro, a joint venture that focuses on the development, design and marketing of medium speed hydrogen combustion engines .

BeHydro is pleased to announce that it aims to commercially launch its first medium speed engine in the course of 2020. BeHydro engines will have a very wide usage range : marine main engine for tugboats, ferries and barges, marine auxiliary engines for all sea-going ships, land-based generators for clean electricity generation, green back-up generator sets, hydrogen locomotive engines, etc.

 

7.5. Hydrobingo

TFC and CMB will combine their forces to try and built a revolutionary ship that will be a milestone in the journey towards zero carbon emission shipping.

This new development also supports Japan’s vision to become a leading hydrogen society by 2050. After receiving the necessary regulatory approval, the ship will be built at TFC’s facilities in Onomichi, Japan and is expected to be delivered in 2021.

Click for more information about HydroBingo.

 

The ship will be built in Onomichi, Japan

7.6. HydroCat

Vattenfall and Windcat Workboats have an accord for the provision of crew transfer vessels (CTV). Vattenfall will be one of the first users of Windcat’s hydrogen-powered vessels.

CMB.TECH and IJmuiden-headquartered vessel operator will be working together on the vessel development, which is expected to be completed by the third quarter of 2020.

The hydrogen CTV – named HydroCat – will be able to transport 24 service engineers from the coast to the offshore windmill farms at a cruise speed of 25kn, propelled by 2x 1000 horsepower and will consume 170 kg of hydrogen per day.

Click for more information about HydroCat.

7.7. hydrotug

CMB is working on the construction of “HydroTug”. This tugboat will be the first in the world to be powered by combustion engines that burn hydrogen in combination with diesel. The port of Antwerp, which requested the construction, has a world first with this project. The HydroTug would be ready within two years.

With HydroTug, CMB confirms its international pioneering role in the transition to ships powered by environmentally friendly fuel.

“We are convinced of the potential of hydrogen as the key to sustainable shipping and making the energy transition of a reality,” says Alexander Saverys, CEO of Compagnie Maritime Belge. “The expertise that we acquire with the Hydrotug will enable us to further develop the use of hydrogen as a ship’s fuel.”

Click for more information about HydroTug.

 

7.8. CONTAINERSCHIP ZERO from MEYER WERFT

  • The hydrogen-fueled container feeder vessel called Zero is envisioned as a zero-emissions ship, which includes fuel cell systems, battery systems and liquid hydrogen storage tanks.
  • Meyer Werft is developing a decentralized and modular electrical and thermal energy grid for passenger vessels based on Fuel Cell Technology, which will have a scalable power output to meet local demand, lower transport losses, use smaller currents and increase safety.
 The Hydrogen-fuelled container feeder vessel vision (Source: DNVGL)
 previous chapter: how is energy obtained?  next chapter: safety

Deurmat

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